Saturday, September 11, 2010

My 1st foldable of the year

My geometry students had a test at the end of this week, and I didn't want to waste the remaining 30 minutes of my block schedule, so I had them take notes on congruent and bisector and the symbols involved. But wait! We can make this "fun" by creating a foldable to glue/tape into their composition notebook and they'll just CLAMOR to study these new words. I even told them that if they got bored over the weekend, and their parents asked them what they wanted to do, they could suggest that as a family, they study and test each other with the foldable. Hours of enjoyment.

Funny side note. As you'll see on my pictures, I had and issue with spelling "length" and I had no "yellow out" and had to refer back to my personal friend "white out". It bothers me, but I've moved on with my life. The story is that I have this student in class that wants to do EVERYTHING perfectly, and when we first started cutting the flaps, she was being very precise with her cuts, and shockingly she wasn't ready when the rest of us started writing and she wanted us to stop and wait for her and oh no I'll be behind and oh this rushing is going to make me mess up and ..... Phew! That's going to be a hindrance to her, the such strong need to be perfect that she doesn't efficiently get her work done. We'll work on it (or she'll develop a nervous tic from my class) one or the other or both.



10 comments:

  1. Emily (Ms. H!)2:09 PM

    Thank you for including the pictures! I'd heard of the concept of "foldables" for math notes, but I'd never seen an example. I love the one you made! Thanks for sharing, because I will definitely be trying this out in my classes in the future. :)

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  2. Emily (Ms. H)2:10 PM

    Thank you for including the pictures! I'd heard of the concept of "foldables" for math notes, but I'd never seen an example. I love the one you made! Thanks for sharing, because I will definitely be trying this out in my geo classes in the next week or two. :)

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  3. You're welcome. Here's tips that made this one easy to do:

    1. fold sharply and neatly hamburger style and open up
    2. fold sharply and neatly hot dog style and open up
    3. now fold into the middle crease from both sides and both orientations

    4. you should have 16 squares.
    5. fold the "shutters" in from a landscape orientation.
    6. cut the 3 shutter folds on each shutter to get 4 flaps.

    Have fun.

    Ms. Cookie

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  4. Length use to give me a problem, too.

    Solved it.

    LONG + TH (and then the vowel alternates)

    Same TH as makes
    Warm + th = warmth
    Deep + th = depth
    Wide + th = width
    Slow + th = sloth
    Merry + th = mirth

    Same or similar TH makes
    bear + th = birth
    steal + th = stealth

    So I had to learn some English along the way. But otherwise, I would have always got that one wrong.

    Jonthan

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  5. Jonthan,

    Those look like great memory tools. I've never thought of it like that before.

    I'm not perfect in the least bit, and this particular hasty misspelling on my part was more a case of muscle memory I'm guessing.

    My hand is racing forward to finish up the word and maybe the muscles remembered that if a word is ending, and there's a "g" there, then an "h" obviously follows (tough, rough, though, ...). Meanwhile, my mind is thinking about the time and what I want to say next and so on and not concentrating on what my hand is deviously doing.

    Ms. Cookie (who needs to get the mind and body together for a chat)

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  6. i love foldables. . . .so glad to see people using them in math!!!

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  7. This is great! Thanks for sharing. When I get to those geometric vocab words that always trip kids up (vertical, corresponding, alt. interior, alt. exterior, etc) I'll definitely be using this!

    Mimi

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  8. I LOVE foldables! My favorite one I've used so far in geometry was a 2-tab venn diagram style for the properties of parallelograms- which was broken down into rectangles, squares, and rhombi.

    I was googling the book I use for them (Dinah Zike's Teaching Math with Foldables) and found a pdf of many examples and pages in the book. Enjoy!

    www.fultonschools.org/k12/math/documents/FoldablesBook.pdf

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  9. I love her book, so I guess I should do more of these. I'm really liking the composition notebook because now there's a place to glue the foldables. And from "confessions from the couch" I like the idea of gluing a pocket on a page sometimes so that the kids can put flashcards in them.

    Ms. Cookie

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  10. Miz Menard11:58 AM

    It was great - thanks for the idea! I give my kids graph paper notebooks in Geometry each year, but schedules are still being changed so I didn't want to distribute them yet. But creating these for our Points, Lines and Planes lesson gave the kids a good reference tool, which they can include in their portfolios or tape into their notebooks when they get them. And this was MUCH more fun than copying notes into a notebook.

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